Orbital Surgery

Orbital Surgery

ORBIT (EYE SOCKET) :

The eyeball, muscles for eye movement, optic nerve, and the surrounding fat are protected by the orbital bones that make up the eye socket. Orbital disorders can vary from infection to trauma and tumors. Thyroid eye disease is also frequently managed by the oculoplastic surgeon for assessment and intervention.

Proptosis

Proptosis due to orbital tumour

Cavernous haemangiom

CT scan: Cavernous haemangiom

On rare occasions, people may be born without an eyeball, may lose vision and end up with a deformed eye due to an injury or disease, such as infection, cancer or glaucoma. You may require surgeries like evisceration or enucleation with an orbital implant to restore the globe’s shape and integrity before a prosthetic eye can be placed. Although there is no vision on the affected eye, this prosthetic eye can improve your cosmesis and self-confidence.

Proptosis

(a) Primary orbital implant

Cavernous haemangiom

(b) Custom ocular prosthesis

Anophthamic left socket in a 4-year-old child following enucleation (for retinoblastoma) by the myoconjunctival technique with a primary orbital implant (a), appears cosmetically optimal following a custom ocular prosthesis (b).

Procedure Focus:

  • Eyelid Disorder Corrective Surgery
  • Eyelid Lesion/ Tumor Excision
  • Eyelid Reconstruction
  • Lacrimal (Tear Duct) Bypass Surgery
  • Canalicular Repair & Punctoplasty
  • Orbital Tumour Excision
  • Orbital Trauma Surgery
  • Orbital Implant Surgery for Prosthetic Eye